Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Fwd: American Bird Conservancy Celebrates 20 Years of Conservation & Other News





-----Original Message-----
From: sholmer@abcbirds.org
To: abcorgs
Sent: Fri, Feb 6, 2015 5:29 am
Subject: American Bird Conservancy Celebrates 20 Years of Conservation & Other News

 

American Bird Conservancy Celebrates 20 Years of Conservation

To mark American Bird Conservancy’s 20th anniversary celebration, please enjoy a brand-new film highlighting some of our favorite conservation stories and read the 20th Anniversary issue of Bird Conservation magazine.  See http://www.abcbirds.org/20years/index.html.

 

“We are proud of the work we've accomplished and grateful to our partners and supporters who make this work possible,” says George Fenwick, ABC’s founder and President. “As we move forward, we reaffirm our commitment to bringing back the birds!”

 

You can also celebrate recent ABC results for birds by reading this month's eNews. From huge new projects to support declining warbler species to advances in fishing methods that benefit rare birds, keep up with the latest news from ABC at http://support.abcbirds.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=3062.0.

 

President’s Budget Calls for Increases for Migratory Bird Conservation

Citing a growing economy, a low unemployment rate, and a greatly reduced annual federal deficit, President Obama has for the first time in four years proposed significant increases to Interior Department programs essential to bird conservation and the maintenance and restoration of important habitats on federal lands.  Migratory birds would benefit from proposed funding increases to the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act, the Joint Ventures Partnerships, and expansions to National Wildlife Refuges.  Endangered species programs are increased, and the Greater Sage-Grouse planning process receives a major boost to $78 million, up from $19 million this year.

 

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell outlined the administration’s budget on an outreach call with conservationists.  She noted an 8% overall proposed increase for the Interior budget, and that reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund with permanent and full funding was a top legislative priority.  Landscape planning and master leasing plans to ensure more sustainable energy development on public lands will also receive additional funds. However, it remains unclear if Congress will support these proposed spending increases. 

 

“The President’s budget recognizes that supporting bird conservation and public lands is a smart investment, benefitting the economy today, and ensuring that future generations of Americans will also enjoy the same bounty,” said Steve Holmer, senior policy advisor with ABC. 

 

One area of concern is the $850 million in proposed cuts over five years in Agriculture Department conservation programs including reducing the Conservation Stewardship Program by 3 million acres and a $373 million cut from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), which offers technical and financial assistance to landowners looking to improve management practices.  One bright note in the Agriculture budget is $330 million for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program, which provides grants to benefit species of conservation concerning including the Golden-winged and Cerulean Warbler.

 

New Cats Indoors ABC Public Service Announcement

 

ABC is preparing to launch a brand new public service announcement campaign this Spring, and we need your help to do it. In order to share this important message about how cats benefit from being indoors, we are asking for a small (or not-so-small) contribution. For a sneak peak at the PSA and a chance to help ABC protect cats, birds, and people, please click the image below.

 

 

NY Law Limits Light Pollution on State Buildings

Migrating birds will greatly benefit from a new law passed by the state of New York which will curtail light pollution from state-owned buildings. A key provision of the bill – which takes effect in a year – requires the use of downward facing, shielded lighting on the exterior of state buildings.

http://www.wkbw.com/news/state-news/law-limits-light-pollution-on-state-buildings.

 

U.S. Shorebirds of Conservation Concern

 

Last month, the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Partnership (USSCP) released its most recent findings assessing the status of U.S. shorebirds in "Shorebirds of Conservation Concern." This updates the USSCP's 2004 plan and contains many more details. The assessment incorporates: 1) new information on shorebird population sizes and trends, 2) a GIS computation of breeding and nonbreeding range sizes, 3) a revised threats assessment, and 4) climate change vulnerability.  See here for the latest assessment: http://tinyurl.com/2015USSCP

 

Shorebirds requiring immediate conservation actions include: Snowy Plover (Interior USA, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean breeding), Mountain Plover, American Oystercatcher (USA/Canada breeding), Whimbrel (Canada breeding), Bristle-thighed Curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit (Alaska breeding), Ruddy Turnstone (Canada breeding), Red Knot (Western Alaska/Russia breeding).

 

(With thanks to Birding Community E-bulletin - February 2015).

 

80th North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference

 

The 80th North American wildlife conference will be in Omaha, Nebraska March 8-13. Review the preliminary conference schedule. 

 

 

To be removed from the list, send any message to:

     abcorgs-unsubscribe@npogroups.org

 

 

 

Steve Holmer

Senior Policy Advisor

American Bird Conservancy &

Director, Bird Conservation Alliance

202-888-7490

sholmer@abcbirds.org

 

www.abcbirds.org, www.birdconservationalliance.org, ABC on Facebook, ABC Videos

 

 

 

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Fwd: New Farm Bill Program to Restore Habitat for Cerulean, Golden-winged Warblers





-----Original Message-----
From: sholmer@abcbirds.org
To: abcorgs
Sent: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 4:59 am
Subject: New Farm Bill Program to Restore Habitat for Cerulean, Golden-winged Warblers

 

New Farm Bill Program to Restore Habitat for Cerulean, Golden-winged Warblers

 

Thanks to Senator Debbie Stabenow, other conservation leaders in the 113th Congress, and the Obama administration, the 2014 Farm Bill is delivering major new resources for an array of habitat restoration projects benefiting bird species of conservation concern, including Cerulean and Golden-winged Warblers.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that 115 high-impact projects will receive $370 million as part of the new Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). In addition, this first round of projects will leverage an estimated $400 million more in partner contributions to improve the nation’s water quality, support wildlife habitat, and enhance the environment. RCPP competitively awards funds to conservation projects, and the grants are just beginning. Over the life of the five-year 2014 Farm Bill, $1.2 billion in funding is slated for the program.

“This is an entirely new approach to conservation efforts; the Regional Conservation Partnership Program ushers in a new era of conservation, and we’re excited about the down-the-road benefits from this new Farm Bill program,” said Tom Vilsack, USDA Secretary. “These partnerships empower communities to set priorities and lead the way on conservation efforts important for their region.”

 

AMJV Partnership Receives $8 Million RCPP Award to Enhance Cerulean Habitat

 

The Cerulean Warbler Appalachian Forestland Enhancement project led by the Appalachian Mountain Joint Venture (AMJV) will allow partners to work with private landowners to enhance 12,500 acres of forest habitat on private lands for Cerulean Warblers and other wildlife. Approximately 1,000 acres of reclaimed mine lands will also be restored using American Chestnut plantings. The 5-year project will be modeled after the NRCS Working Lands for Wildlife Program for Golden-winged Warblers, using the recently released Cerulean Warbler Habitat Management Guidelines to guide conservation practices in delineated focal areas. Conservation work will take place in the states of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Ohio, and Maryland.

"This project will create a tremendous opportunity for our partnership to engage private landowners and promote contiguous areas of viable working forests to help ensure long-term conservation of Cerulean Warblers," said Todd Fearer, AMJV Coordinator.


Partners contributing forest management, coordination, landowner enrollment, outreach, and other activities for this project include: American Bird Conservancy, Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative/Green Forests Work, Indiana University of Pennsylvania-Research Institute, KY Department of Agriculture State Apiarist, MD Department of Natural Resources Forest Service, National Wild Turkey Federation, Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation, and Enforcement, PA Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources Bureau of Forestry, PA Game Commission, The American Chestnut Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, University of Kentucky, WV Division of Natural Resources, WV Division of Forestry, West Virginia University. For more information see
http://amjv.org/index.php/news/520.

Forest Restoration Projects to Benefit Imperiled Golden-winged Warbler

Another of the RCPP projects will target improvements on approximately 64,000 acres of key habitat for the Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA) in the Great Lakes states of Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.  The GWWA has suffered one of the steepest population declines of any songbird species, with a decline of more than three percent annually over the last 40 years across its range.

 

“Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin have the largest remaining breeding population of the GWWA, and habitat management actions there are considered critical to rebuilding populations rapidly,” said Dr. George Fenwick, President of American Bird Conservancy. “This is the poster-bird for recovery of complex early successional forest habitat.”

 

Across its breeding cycle, the GWWA needs forested landscapes varying in age from young regenerating stands to those with mature forest characteristics. Core habitat for the GWWA has been identified through the GWWA Working Group, a consortium of partners that has targeted focal areas for conservation and management using a series of GWWA Best Management Practices.

 

The project is expected to create new breeding habitat for 1,180 pairs of GWWAs and result in an increase of 16,000 individuals within four years.  This will be achieved by providing technical support to private landowners whose properties lie within designated focal areas, helping them develop and implement conservation management plans for their properties. Similar to other NRCS programs, financial assistance will be available to qualifying landowners. Prescribed management practices may include aspen management, timber improvement, and shrubland restoration.

 

In addition to benefiting the GWWA, the conservation effort is expected to aid preservation of approximately 20 additional at-risk species such as American Woodcock, Ruffed Grouse, Black-billed Cuckoo, Moose, Canada Lynx, and Northern Long-eared Bat.

 

The project will be managed in partnership between NRCS and American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and

participating groups include: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge; Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge; Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Woodcock Minnesota; Beltrami County, MN; The Conservation Fund; Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; U.S. Forest Service; Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest; Ruffed Grouse Society/The American Woodcock Society; Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association; Wisconsin County Forests Association; Wildlife Management Institute; The Forestland Group; Pheasants Forever; National Wild Turkey Federation; Michigan Department of Natural Resources; Louisiana-Pacific Corporation; Michigan Tech University; Indiana University of Pennsylvania Research Institute; Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development; and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

 

For more information see: http://www.abcbirds.org/newsandreports/releases/150114.html

 

To be removed from the list, send any message to:

     abcorgs-unsubscribe@npogroups.org

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Holmer

Senior Policy Advisor

American Bird Conservancy &

Director, Bird Conservation Alliance

202-888-7490

sholmer@abcbirds.org

 

www.abcbirds.org

 

www.birdconservationalliance.org

 

ABC on Facebook

 

ABC Videos

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Fwd: Protect Michigan's Birds: Stand Up for Bird-Smart Wind Energy





-----Original Message-----
From: info@abcbirds.org
To: prosbird
Sent: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 11:42 am
Subject: Protect Michigan's Birds: Stand Up for Bird-Smart Wind Energy

Short-eared Owl, Randimal/Shutterstock

Please stand up for birds that rely on habitat in an essential migratory corridor in Huron County, Michigan, where more than 300 large wind turbines already exist and as many as 900 more are planned.

Thousands of migratory birds pass through this area every year. The addition of hundreds of wind turbines increases the gauntlet of challenges faced by these birds. Potential casualties include threatened and endangered species like Piping Plover, Kirtland’s Warbler, Henslow’s Sparrow, Bald Eagle, and Short-eared Owl (pictured).

Alternative energy is critically important, but we strongly believe that wind energy is not smart unless it's bird-smart. Please voice your concerns today about the additional turbines proposed for important bird habitat in Huron County, Michigan!


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American Bird Conservancy | P.O. Box 249 | The Plains, VA 20198 | 888-247-3624 

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Friday, December 19, 2014

Fwd: Boardwalk petition - PLEASE DISTRIBUTE!


-----Original Message-----
From: isanoff <isanoff@aol.com>
To: isanoff <isanoff@aol.com>
Sent: Fri, Dec 19, 2014 10:36 am
Subject: Boardwalk petition - PLEASE DISTRIBUTE!


Hi folks, 

Usually, I never send out requests for signing on to online petitions. But we've got a problem here in southern Brooklyn and the Parks Department won't give us the time of day. 

Parks is trying to turn the iconic, historic Coney Island boardwalk into a concrete slab sidewalk. We have evidence that this will exacerbate storm surge damage, but of course, they won't listen. There are sustainable woods that can be used on the boardwalk, but Parks is insisting on concrete. 

Our two shoreline Councilmen, Mark Treyger and Chaim Deutsch, have started this online petition to try and get the boardwalk declared a scenic landmark, which will help to preserve its character. But in order to do so, they need to show that there is public interest in this.

So please sign, distribute to your lists and add to your Facebook pages. 

Thanks!
Ida